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Category: Kids and Dogs
  1. We adopted a 2 year old dog from a shelter. The dog pays more attention to me than my 7 year old son. He is devastated over this. What do I do?
  2. Our 7 month old dog will not pay attention to our 3 year old daughter. How do I help "grow" a relationship between my daughter and my dog?
  3. What websites or books will help me decide what breed of dog is best for our two young children, ages 6 and 8?
  4. How do I convince my parents I am responsible enough for a new dog?
  5. I want a dog, but my dad is getting me a cat! What should I do?
  6. When I put my 8 wk old puppy on the floor, he jumps all over my 1 yr old son and makes him cry. What can I do?
  7. What is proper behavior for children when they are around the dog's pen or crate? Should they leave him alone?
  8. We have 2 children, ages 6 and 8. We have a new dog and I was wondering how I can be sure my kids will take responsibility for the dog as they promised before we got him.
  9. I think our 6 year old is a bit jealous of the new puppy. How do we handle this?
  10. My 9 week old puppy chases my 1 yr old daughter around the house and steals her toys. How do I stop this?



  1. We adopted a 2 year old dog from a shelter. The dog pays more attention to me than my 7 year old son. He is devastated over this. What do I do?
    Your dog is probably attached to you because it was an adult who cared for him most of the time. You can explain it to your son that way. Next, I would let your son feed the dog all of his meals. In fact whatever dog-related duty there is, let your son take care of it, assuming it is of course something he can handle. Tell him that it'll take the dog time to get used to him. Your dog should start focusing on your son as he becomes more dependent on him for the food. Your son can also carry small treats around in his pocket to feed the dog all during the day. Fortunately, most dogs are food driven and can learn almost anything when there is food involved. They should be pals in no time!
    Category: Kids and Dogs
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  2. Our 7 month old dog will not pay attention to our 3 year old daughter. How do I help "grow" a relationship between my daughter and my dog?
    Your dog is probably attached to you because it was an adult who cared for him most of the time. You can explain it to your daughter that way, although at only 3 years of age, she might be a bit young to understand. Unfortunately, some dogs just don't ever warm up to being around very young children. This is probably okay since a three year old can't really be responsible to know how to respect a dog's space. But you can start using those terms...space, privacy, etc. Try to help your child understand the dog. Normally, I would tell you to let your daughter feed the dog all of his meals, and take care of the dog chores as well. But at her age, I think this is a bit beyond expectations. I think the best thing is to just let it happen - don't rush things. Have your daughter do some distracting things like drawing pictures of your dog and posting them on the refridgerator. Maybe the two of you can take the dog for walks together. Sitting with your daughter when she wants to be with the dog should help. If the dog likes you, then it should make being with your daughter okay as well.
    Category: Kids and Dogs
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  3. What websites or books will help me decide what breed of dog is best for our two young children, ages 6 and 8?
    There are several books that profile breeds and their sociability. One is called Your Purebred Puppy...A Buyer's Guide by Michele Lowell. It has a portion about temperament also. The American Kennel Club (http://www.akc.org) also profiles each breed. You might visit a local dog show with your kids and go up to dogs you like and see how they behave (the dogs and your kids!). You can question their owners, but keep in mind that some breeders will only say positive things because they are looking to sell a puppy. But you can see how the kids react to that dog. From my own experience, a few dogs that are good with kids are collies, golden retrievers, and labrador retrievers. You can also visit the dogs in the humane society or animal shelter. There you can let the kids play with them. After visiting lots of kinds of dogs, have a family meeting and write down the advantages and disadvantages of each one and vote on the best for everyone.
    Category: Kids and Dogs
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  4. How do I convince my parents I am responsible enough for a new dog?
    Showing your parents that you are responsible is a very good way to help convince them that you will help with a new dog when it arrives. Just keep in mind that there may be other reasons that your parents do not want a dog. A good place to start is to read this page: http://loveyourdog.com/anewdog.html. Do all the assignments on this page. Also, read this page and do what it says: http://loveyourdog.com/commitment.html Here's another assignment: http://loveyourdog.com/lifetime.html Keep a nice notebook that you can show to your parents when you are all finished. Do a good job; think about your answers. Do some good research into the kind of dog you want and add what you have learned to your notebook. Ask your parents if they have some jobs for you. Tell them you want to show them that you are responsible. Tell them you want daily or weekly jobs, not just something on one day. You may need to show them over 6 months or year that you will keep your promises. Make sure you do all of your homework and work very hard in school. Make good decisions about everything you do. Follow directions and do favors for people around you. Look for opportunities to help people out and offer your assistance. Those are some things you can do to prove you are responsible. But remember, your parents may have some very good reasons why they don't want a dog. You'll have to respect their decision in the end.
    Category: Kids and Dogs
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  5. I want a dog, but my dad is getting me a cat! What should I do?
    First, since the cat will be your new pet, it would be a good thing to learn how best to care for it. Taking care of a cat will be good practice for when you do get a dog. They don't need as much training as a dog, but they do need love and affection, care, and time with you. Getting a cat doesn't mean you have to give up on a dog. If you love dogs and they are like a hobby to you, keep learning about them. Here's a good page for you to read: But I Don't Have a Dog!" It will tell you all kinds of things you can do while you are waiting for your dog. One great thing about being human is that we can do more than one thing at a time. So go for it...love your cat and enjoy reading and learning about dogs.
    Category: Kids and Dogs
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  6. When I put my 8 wk old puppy on the floor, he jumps all over my 1 yr old son and makes him cry. What can I do?
    Your son and your dog are both too young to be together and to understand why the other is acting a specific way. Your son will understand when he is 3 or 4 years old, maybe. Your dog won't understand until he is mature, and trained, probably when he is 1-2 years old. So you have some work to do to handle this situation.

    Keeping the pup in the house is the best way to make him a wonderful housepet. But never leave your son and your dog alone together - ever. Always supervise them. Be on the floor with your leashed puppy and hold him when you allow your son to gently touch him. Always have your puppy leashed when he is around your son. Get a playpen or exercise pen from a pet store and put your son in one and the puppy in the other. That way they can see each other. Don't try to change your son's reaction to the puppy. Just start this relationship over gently - just touching the dog and praise both the puppy and your son.

    When your pup is 4 months old, take him to a puppy class and then continue with obedience lessons. Dogs learn how to be around people through training and socialization. As your son gets older, you can include him in activities that you do with your dog, but don't push it. Your son should learn to love your dog slowly as they learn to trust each other.

    Category: Kids and Dogs
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  7. What is proper behavior for children when they are around the dog's pen or crate? Should they leave him alone?
    When a dog goes to his pen or crate, he generally wants to chill out and be alone. Dogs need privacy, just as people do. And that's a good way to explain it to your kids. It would be fine for them to peek in and say hi to their dog for just a moment, but this is good opportunity to teach them about respecting the privacy of people as well as animals.
    Category: Kids and Dogs
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  8. We have 2 children, ages 6 and 8. We have a new dog and I was wondering how I can be sure my kids will take responsibility for the dog as they promised before we got him.
    Keep in mind that although kids always say they will help with the care of the dog, a 6 and 8 year old will often get bored within 6 months of the purchase so be prepared. You might do some projects to help them get more involved and to hold their interest. One idea is to give each of your kids an album to keep track of the dog's progress and development. Even an adult dog will be learning all sorts of new things in a new home. The kids can draw pictures, add photos, or write sentences in it. Also, alternating the doggie chores between kids will give them some variety. Make 2 chores lists. For the first week or two, assign each child to a list. For the second week or two, trade chores so the kids get more experience and something new to do. There are also several craft books that help keep kids interested in the dog hobby. Visit this link for fun books: Craft and Activity Books
    Category: Kids and Dogs
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  9. I think our 6 year old is a bit jealous of the new puppy. How do we handle this?
    I think that your six year old is acting normally. I would treat the situation just as if you were dealing with jealousy between two children. Make sure you interact with both at the same time, and individually as well. That will give them each alone time with you so that they feel special.

    Another thing you can do is to enclose the puppy in a pen or a crate in the same room where you are interacting with your child. Now the puppy is near you. Your child has special time with your complete attention and the puppy is still seeing you and getting used to your voices.

    Another thing you can do is to let your child help with the doggie chores. A six year old can help feed and water the pup. He can help brush the pup while you hold it. Your child can hold onto the leash, with you holding it, when you walk the puppy. Your child can even help give the puppy a bath.

    One fun thing you can do is to make a photo album with pictures of your child and the pup doing different things together. Your child can dictate sentences to you on each page and create his first book! You can even send me a cute picture of the two of them and I will post in on How to Love Your Dog (anonymously, of course)! My email address is photo@loveyourdog.com. Most children get a kick out of seeing their photo on the Internet. I hope these suggestions help.

    Category: Kids and Dogs
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  10. My 9 week old puppy chases my 1 yr old daughter around the house and steals her toys. How do I stop this?
    You are wise to get this problem under control. When your dog is older and bigger, this kind of behavior will create an even bigger problem. First, just like your daughter, your puppy should never be unsupervised, even when your daughter is not around. Also, young children and dogs should never be left alone together until your child is old enough and physically large enough to control your dog, which is usually when the child is around 10 years of age.

    To get your pup and your daughter familiar with each other, play with them together. Hold the puppy while your child gently pets him. Give your pup time outs in a crate or a pen that you have in the house. Your child will be able to see the pup and vice versa.

    As far as the particular situation you describe, if it should happen, even with you in the room, try to keep everything calm. Don't punish the puppy, since she is just doing what is natural. To stop the chasing, pick up the pup and give him a time out. This pup is way too young for punishment. Change the situation to a more positive interaction. If the pup has stolen a toy, simply take the toy from the pup, and give him a toy of his own.

    You certainly have your hands full with two youngsters. The best way to solve these kinds of problems is to avoid the situation in the first place. Please take some time to read through How to Love Your Dog and you will find lots of helpful suggestions.

    Category: Kids and Dogs
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