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The priest and the pretty waitresses

From "The Times of India"

A Polish priest, who has opened a nationwide chain of cafe-bars, promises to employ only sexy waitresses.
A Polish priest has started a row after opening a nationwide chain of cafe-bars and promising to employ only sexy waitresses. Father Henryk Jankowski, a priest who played a prominent role in the Solidarity movement, said: "Ugly women need not apply to become waitresses in my cafes .
" He is to open a chain of 16 cafe-bars across Poland and will only employ good looking girls. He dismissed critics saying it was all for charity. His firm, the Father Henryk Jankowski Institute, has also launched perfume and wine labels. But he started a row after he said he has strict criteria for women who want to work in the new coffee shops and added: "Only attractive women will be hired."

Wasn't he the guy who was kicked out after making a nativity scene in his church with a swastika a hammer and sickle and a star of David, as well as a life size plastic German Shepherd. Also there was something about buying drugs for male prostitutes. Crazy.

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

I would have thought a Priest should concentrate on his job as a Priest, not in making cash! I wonder what sort of car he drives?

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

I understand he has a limousine and lives in extreme luxury.

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

"I wonder what sort of car he drives?"

A Maybach.

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

Sorry, I'm told it's father Rydzyk who owns a Maybach.

Father Jankowski is said to have just an ordinary Jag :) . He's also the one who once owned an amber mining company, since he wanted to have an altar made entirely of amber :) . I saw him once on TV, complaining that there's not enough amber on Polish coast for his purposes.

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

Jankowski has been in business for a long time. He even had his own vodka brand, trucking company, and supposedly couple of high-end brothels.

The late Pope was not happy with him so he kept quiet.

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

"Father Jankowski is said to have just an ordinary Jag"

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

I posted something ages back about him hanging out in bars with pretty young men, who he'd encourage to molest waitresses as if the women were favours he could provide.
Scandalous, even for the Polish church.

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

When he was finally fired, didn't his band of supporters vandalise the Archbishop of Gdansk's car, spraypainting words like "jew" and "mason" on it as well as tying things to the bumpers. They showed it on TV and it looked like the Mohair Brigade had done a fairly thorough job.

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

Jankowski has been in business for a long time. He even had his own vodka brand, trucking company, and supposedly couple of high-end brothels.

The late Pope was not happy with him so he kept quiet.

Its always interesting to hear comments about the catholic church or priests, normally its stories about secret bank accounts, women, or drunkenness,and normally the comments come from people who never go to church or have a negative attitude towards the church. Owning a trucking company must be a new entry on the books!
A lot of the gossip about priest (church) originates from groups of people who congregate at local parks (usually old men) who share from a bottle of vodka, the ones you see urinating in full view of passing pedestrians.
Mike C I hope your information didn't come from these people? perhaps you may want to provide specific details?

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

Corruption and wrong-doings within the Church are something I know very little about. The media here would not report such things unless absolutely necessary. But I will say that I've never seen a Priest driving an old or cheap car in Poland.

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

"originates from groups of people who congregate at local parks (usually old men) who share from a bottle of vodka, the ones you see urinating in full view of passing pedestrians."


Or in town squares and on street corners .

Vodka is a bit expensive. Favored drinks are fruit wine and denaturat (Paint stripper).

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

Offbeat...your anti-American rants are one thing but please..you do not know me or my Church going habits.

I would suggest you google “Henry Jankowski” and see what you come up with.

Oh but wait, then you’ll just say that it’s the evil American capitalists bad mouthing an honest priest.

His business practices are well known in Poland’s business community (or just about anyone who lives in Gdansk). Not your circles, obviously.

You are defending a guy who once used swastikas, stars of david, and political parties he opposed in an altar display during Sunday Mass. This is how he became notorious internationally when Lech Walesa was still President.

If this is your idea of a priest then I feel sorry for you.

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

You are defending a guy who once used swastikas, stars of david, and political parties he opposed in an altar display during Sunday Mass. This is how he became notorious internationally when Lech Walesa was still President.

Mike C you like to throw mud, I'll ask you again to prove specific allegations. It may pay to think before you speak and remember who you are, remember your background and remember the struggles endured by Poles over a thousand years. If you identify as a American well say so, but leave the polish people alone.

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

But don't you think, offbeat, that these rogue Priests should be exposed for what they are?

Pretending that these people do not exist is ridiculous. Sweeping things under the rug or burying your head in the sand, ostrich-fashion, is not the way to go.

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

“Mike C you like to throw mud, I'll ask you again to prove specific allegations.”

And I am telling you again to google his name. Then we can chat.

“It may pay to think before you speak and remember who you are, remember your background and remember the struggles endured by Poles over a thousand years. If you identify as a American well say so, but leave the polish people alone.”

DO NOT even go there. Anyone familiar with my previous postings will tell you how ridiculous you sound. But regardless, Jankowski is obviously a hero of yours. Not mine.

If you are such a staunch Catholic perhaps you should research how John Paul II felt about Jankowski and Rydzyk.

One last thing – these priests, as they call themselves, use heroic Polish history to manipulate people of faith

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

From the New York Times:

Published: June 17, 1995

Several prominent Polish Jews appealed to President Lech Walesa today to disassociate himself from anti-Semitic remarks made last Sunday by a Roman Catholic priest while the President sat in the congregation.

Mr. Walesa has declined to comment on a statement by the Rev. Henryk Jankowski during a sermon that the "Star of David is implicated in the swastika as well as the hammer and sickle." The priest added: "Poles, bestir yourselves. We can no longer tolerate governments made up of people who have not declared whether they come from Moscow or from Israel."

The priest, who played a role in the Solidarity movement in the 1980's and who usually officiates at the Mass the President attends in Gdansk, issued another statement on Wednesday in which he said: "The Star of David symbolizes not only the state of Israel but also the Jewish nation. Like all other people, Jews happen to do unbecoming things in public life just as they happen to do very noble things indeed. I am talking chiefly about banking and finance circles."

Stanislaw Krajewski, a consultant here to the American Jewish Committee, said that because Father Jankowski is an important figure in the Catholic church in Poland, his comments moved "anti-Semitism from the margins to the center of Polish politics." Mr. Krajewski appealed to Mr. Walesa to make a clear public statement condemning the priest's words.

The secretary of the Roman Catholic Bishops Conference in Poland, Bishop Tadeusz Pieronek, distanced the church from the sermon, saying it destroyed "long efforts" at good relations between the Catholic church and Judaism.

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

The money from the initiative would go to the "Father Henryk Jankowski Institute," = scamming poor Polish widows and pensioners.

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

KSIĄDZ HENRYK JANKOWSKI


HENRYK JANKOWSKI

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

Father Rydzyk is also in the news again. Something about calling the President's wife a witch or similar. No time for details now.

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

Poland Takes Stock on Anniversary,
Bemoans Loss of National Cohesion
By MATTHEW KAMINSKI

Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

September 1, 2000

GDANSK, Poland -- Mass at St. Brygida's Church, the spiritual home of the Solidarity movement, winds up turning into a political gathering, like in the old days.

The difference, of course, is in the politics. On this Sunday in August, longtime pastor Henryk Jankowski makes a plea for "a Poland for Poles." "Our motherland, our country, our home," he goes on, "is today ruled by people foreign to us, politicians and ideologies alien to our land."
Books on sale outside the church door identify the threat more explicitly: one title is "Jews and Masonry," another "The Popes on Jews, Masons and Communists."

No Secret

By now, Father Jankowski's views are no secret. He is a voice of the ultranationalist, Christian wing of Polish politics that usually draws up to 5% of the vote in parliamentary elections. Many in the Catholic Church hierarchy frown on him. Lech Walesa, a close friend from the 1980s, rarely visits anymore.

I tell Father Jankowski I haven't been back to St. Brygida's since 1989, on the very same Sunday when Solidarity triumphed after years of a struggle launched a few blocks away at the Lenin Shipyard. Father Jankowski stood firmly by during the difficult years. Staring down threats from the secret police, he held Mass inside the shipyard during the big strikes of 1970 and, when Solidarity was born, in 1980.

And he shared in the euphoria that day in 1989 when the Communist regime handed the reins of government to Tadeusz Mazowiecki, a Catholic Solidarity intellectual. The prime minister-designate had come up to Gdansk to meet Mr. Walesa, the movement's leader, at St. Brygida's. In his sermon that day, Father Jankowski told Mr. Mazowiecki: "You will lead us to a free, independent Poland."

Eleven years later, his message to the congregation is Poland isn't yet free and "the fight with evil continues." Father Jankowski speaks to people the revolution left behind, the unemployed, the uneducated. (The Church reprimanded him for making anti-Semitic remarks a few years ago.)

After Mass, he looks at me and smiles, saying now isn't the time to celebrate anniversaries when there is "suffering." I ask him what he means by "foreigners" in government. "These people wear masks; we must clean them out," he responds, choosing his words carefully, and walks off.

Public Soul-Searching

The 20th anniversary of Solidarity has led to a lot of public soul-searching over how divided Poland has become. The current Solidarity leader, Marian Krzaklewski, an unknown in 1980, seemed eager to use the celebrations to boost his chances at winning the presidency in October. Squabbles erupted over who should be invited to Gdansk for the event. Mr. Walesa for a while threatened to boycott.

In an interview with Gazeta Wyborcza, the former Solidarity daily whose politics these days are more urban and center-left, an organizer of the August 1980 strike pleaded for a return of national cohesion that seems to exist only in history books.

"It wasn't important where you came from," said Bogdan Borusewicz. "We were able to get organized around what unified us, and the best qualities emerged in people. And for that reason the anniversary belongs to all Poles -- not only to the workers who today pay their NSZZ Solidarity [trade union] dues."

The past can be romanticized. But that doesn't make the memories false. The 1989 Mass at St. Brygida's brought together workers, academics, Communist Party members, the young and old. The church overflowed. People spontaneously sang the national anthem and raised their hands with the victory sign. Mr. Walesa cried in prayer. "I cannot imagine the same ambience, the same single-mindedness, in other words the same solidarity, anywhere else in the world," I wrote in my notebook that afternoon.

Anxious Days

But those days were also filled with anxiety over the future. No one knew whether a democratic government could fix the problems inherited from the communists. The economy was a mess. "Poles will fight for their country," one American observed at the time, "but will they work for it?"

In a moment that changed history, when the first domino in the Soviet bloc fell squarely toward the West, an awareness of the political reality came through in Mr. Mazowiecki's speech at St. Brygida's: "We have to rid ourselves of this feeling of hopelessness. We have to believe that this nation, which is a wonderful nation, can create an environment in which we can live better. So in Poland there will be no more shortages; so that people stop leaving the country."

The questions in that morning's interview with Gazeta Wyborcza were skeptical too: "What, sir, will you do so that people will feel that something has really changed?"

Mr. Mazowiecki: "But don't you think, my lady, that if for the first time in 40 years there is a noncommunist prime minister, that something hasn't already changed?"

The day of Solidarity's triumph, Aug. 20, probably marked the end of solidarity in Poland. Pluralism, what Mr. Walesa fought for, took hold with surprising speed in the new era. The country broke up into parties and factions; Solidarity as everyone then knew was an unwieldy coalition brought together for a single goal. The economy revived within two years.
What began in 1980 and ended nine years later changed the Roman Catholic Church, too. Under communism, it was a national institution, teaching Poles, in the words of the dissident writer Adam Michnik, they should bow only before God. Now it is adjusting to a different role in a dynamic society that, within a few years, will be in a prosperous, secular European Union.

Lively Port

The red-brick St. Brygida's and the nearby Lenin Shipyard are in a quiet, drab, industrial part of Gdansk. A 15-minute walk toward the center, a different city rises up. The streets around the 14th-century town hall in the Long Market are jammed with foreign tourists and cafes, stores are full of necklaces and rings made out of amber. A folk band, the Canadian Bad Boys, plays on the canal. It resembles Copenhagen, Hamburg, Tallinn even -- a lively Hanseatic port. A month before the presidential elections, few political posters can be seen.

By most measures Gdansk, the city that probably more than any other in Europe has come to symbolize the horrors and triumphs of the 20th century, starts the millennium on a high note.

Outside St. Mary's Church in the old center, Boguslaw Demidowicz, 60 years old, cuts a lonely figure. He is collecting signatures for Mr. Walesa's presidential bid. In half an hour, two people stop and sign the petition. Mr. Walesa, a former president who lost his seat in 1995, is a long-shot this year. "You know, as the old saying goes, a prophet is never loved at home," says Mr. Demidowicz.

Without evident bitterness, the Walesa volunteer says, "people have forgotten what it was like before."
Write to Matthew Kaminski at matthew.kaminski@wsj.com

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

where are you offbeat? care to comment?

didnt think so

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

"Cappo di tutti Virtuti. Rev. Henryk Jankowski wears Virtuti Militari Order, which he is not entitled to. Under the law it is a crime to wear distinctions, which a person has been illegally awarded with. Thus the Gdansk police is out to arrest Rev. Jankowski. The problem is that the cops just cannot catch the Reverend red-handed. Yes there are plenty of photos showing Rev. Jankowski with a rainbow of orders and medals on his breast, but the police seem not to notice. The Reverend keeps wearing his illegal orders, and the police keep looking for him. The comedy is detailed by Waldemar Kuchanny."

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

...and also saying that the presidents decisions were 'controled by jews'.

I can't quite believe it, but I'm feeling something approaching respect for the twins. Booting out Lepper and calling Rydzik's comments scandalous - honourable behaviour!

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

where are you offbeat? care to comment?

didn't think so.


I'm not a spokesperson for the Catholic Church, its interesting how quick you are to put down the church but very defensive of America.

You would have to be the village idiot to believe everything you read in the newspaper, One thing that the Communist newspapers have in common with current newspapers (that includes Australia)is that they are full of rubbish, half truths and agenda based. A lot of the information is taken out of context given its own spin and given to silly people to believe.
Can I suggest you stick with reading Donald Duck and Micky Mouse comics

I hope the recent heated discussion hasn't stretched our friendship!

Re: The priest and the pretty waitresses

"I'm not a spokesperson for the Catholic Church"

Are you slow or retarded? Rydzyk and company do not speak for the the Church. Jankowski has been reprimended by the Pope more than any other Polish priest.