Poland and Polish Discussion Group and Forum

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Poland and Polish Discussion Group and Forum
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Strange Polish things

I like birch juice!

I couldn't believe my eyes when I first saw it ... juice from trees! Really?

By the way, my wife was astonished when I told her I absolutely had to buy some chanterelles in Milanowek market (just to the west of Warsaw) last Saturday. I can't believe she's never bought me any - such a delicacy. Even the kids loved them.

Anybody got any tips for out-of-the-ordinary Polish food or drink (including alcohol)?

Re: Strange Polish things

I don't believe I've ever found anything very unique in Poland, foodwise.

I don't drink, so I can't comment on Polish alcohol.

Birch juice is available in some German healthstores. Tried it once, didn't like it.

Re: Strange Polish things

Ptasie Mleczko are quite unique and sliwki czekoladowe (prunes covered in chocolate) must be the most unusual sweet around.

Re: Strange Polish things

Ania, If they sold a product in the UK called 'Birds milk' do you think it would sell?

Re: Strange Polish things

The almost univeral habit of picking things to eat in the wild.

Re: Strange Polish things

Anybody got any tips for out-of-the-ordinary Polish food or drink (including alcohol)?


Not unusual in Poland, but something I rather like - Kefir (sour yogurt) with chopped pickled gherkin and dill.

Re: Strange Polish things

i'd suggest 'buttermilk' ... memories (ok, "some time ago") of trying to buy the stuff in England. It's as common in NI as it is in Poland but I couldn't buy it at all in Ipswich.

Re: Strange Polish things

Chrupki

Re: Strange Polish things

"Ania, If they sold a product in the UK called 'Birds milk' do you think it would sell?"

Well Birds custard does pretty well!

Mleczko is not technically milk...it is a diminutive and cuteish.

Re: Strange Polish things

Buttermilk - superb when making pancakes, little known in England ... why?

Re: Strange Polish things

I have a theory that traditional food in a country tends to go with the weather. So in the UK they like comfort food like sausage and mash or treacle tart and custard to compensate for the rain.

Re: Strange Polish things

"
I have a theory that traditional food in a country tends to go with the weather."

Which is why Bigos hits the spot on a very cold day.

I've fallen in love with Czernina, a soup made from duck's blood & dried fruit. Tastes much better than it sounds.

Re: Strange Polish things

The first time I arrived to Poland was during the height of strawberry season. The family I lived with seemingly ate strawberries day and night for three weeks. The variety of strawberry meals was surprising to say the least. Most of it was good, but I couldn't quite take a liking to pasta covered in strawberry sauce (served hot or cold).

Re: Strange Polish things

That sounds nice Wild. In my experience they have a lot of fruit mixed with pasta or rice dishes. Pierogi filled with strawberries are one of my faves with cream on top. You can pretend it's a bit healthy because it has fruit

I've also had rice with apples (a hot pudding), strawberry or plum knedle, and apple pancakes/fritters (to replace a main meal on fridays). In the winter, winter fruits compote (with spiced dried apple, pear, prunes).

Berry compote is delicious in the summer (hot or cold). I'm surprised they don't have this as a staple in the UK given the summer fruits crop. I imagine it used to be around before mass food consumerism. Or maybe another victim of the damp weather in the UK.

Re: Strange Polish things

Fruit drinks died with the advent of consumerism.

Many British kids can't stomach strawberries and raspberries as they are too sour for them.

Pierogi - it's perfectly healthy food to eat so long as you don't use sunflower oil (which should never be used except, perhaps, in certain cakes). That is truly bad for you. Lard/dripping is less unhealthy for you than sunflower oil, and tastes better too.

Re: Strange Polish things

What about extra virgin olive oil? I always use that for frying. I thought it was healthier than the alternatives.....can you buy it in Poland?

Re: Strange Polish things

What's wrong with sunflower oil? I buy this ready-mixed with olive oil for frying.

Re: Strange Polish things

Olive Oil sells well here - every shop has it (in cities, at least) but pierogi etc really need Slonina.

Re: Strange Polish things

http://www.nutripeople.co.uk/healthnotes_content.asp?org=fmn&page=newswire/hnwire_2000-04-06_1.cfm

Olive oil supposedly lowers blood pressure Hans. See above article which confirms some study or other on the subject.

Re: Strange Polish things

I'm a bit pushed for time, but essentially if you really need to deep fry, use sunflower oil, but once only then discard - it can't be re-used safely.

There are far better links than the one I'm posting but I've got no time to look for them now

http://www.thescreamonline.com/essays/essays5-1/vegoil.html